“Yes to Scholars, No to Hitmen,”Andrés Manuel López Obrador Outlines Ambitious 6-Part Initiative focused on Mexican Youth Education & Work Life

“Yes to Scholars, No to Hitmen,”Andrés Manuel López Obrador Outlines Ambitious 6-Part Initiative focused on Mexican Youth Education & Work Life

Andrés Manuel López Obrador has a plan to heal Mexico’s youth from a life of crime, illiteracy, and unemployment. The solution is not more jails or using the military to imprison young criminals. He has publicly stated that he does not believe in retributive justice or an eye for an eye mentality. Previous administrations have sought to fight fire with fire, sending armies to battle the criminal young, while ignoring the root of the problem.  For López Obrador, the real issue is that Mexico’s youth has been neglected. They have been denied opportunities to study and to work. He plans to change that.

 

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Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Photo: Info7.Mx

 

Campaigning as a revolutionary president who is committed to healing his nation, López Obrador has designed an ambitious 6-part initiative titled, Jovenes Construyendo El Futuro (Youth Building the Future). This program will keep youth in the classrooms, channel them into the universities, engage them in apprenticeships, and mentor them through business partnerships that will boost the Mexican economy and revive neglected parts of Mexico. The students will receive monthly scholarships as an incentive to complete their training.

 

amlo y la juventud
Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Photo Cultura Colectiva News

 

The Jovenes Construyendo El Futuro (Youth Building the Future) initiative is divided into six programs:

  1. Young People Reenergizing the Fields. This project will support young people who live in rural areas and/or want to work in agriculture or the land. They have specialized knowledge related to this industry and are interested in applying it. This will be the largest program of its kind: one million people will receive support per year.

 

  1. Brigades of Community Action. This branch will support 822,448 young people per year and concentrate on those who want to benefit their community, such as through civil protection, cleaning, and sanitation of tourist areas, recovery of public spaces and literacy projects.

 

  1. Youth for Hope. This program will benefit 225,000 young people per year in the areas of the arts (including music), sports, sexuality, and emotional health, addiction prevention, and nutrition.

 

  1. Young people + X Venir. This program requires the investment of the business sector. It will support 200,000 young people who have not secured jobs, linking them with companies from all branches that will train and certify them. Small, medium and large companies will be invited to serve as mentors of the beneficiaries, mainly in economic, agricultural, fishing and tourism industries.

 

  1. Launch. With this program, 200,000 young entrepreneurs will be supported each year. Grant seed capital and/or entrepreneurial loans will facilitate training and economic resources.

 

  1. Young Scholars. Young adults enrolled in higher education will be linked to public sector opportunities. The idea is to integrate 50,000 university students or recent graduates under the age of 30, who have outstanding academic accomplishments and who are interested in participating in professional internships, into the field of public service in exchange for scholarships.

 

The Mexican business sector and president-elect, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, joined forces to develop Mexico’s southern economy and to provide work alternatives for young people.

To sustain López Obrador’s initiative, the government will transfer state resources to the companies who partner with the government to hire and mentor youth.

The project is expected to serve 2.6 million young people yearly.

The ultimate goal is to benefit approximately 15.5 million young people by the end of Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s term and will focus specifically on Mexicans between the ages of 15 and 29.

Becarios, Si, Sicarios, No.

Soledad Quartucci

Dr. Soledad Vidal Quartucci has a PhD from UC Irvine in United States History with an emphasis in Immigration and Feminist studies. She has a passion for bringing immigrant narratives to the forefront of the American experience. Immigrants’ concerns and contributions don’t normally make it to mainstream American news. Her writings are a contribution to broadening what makes news in America; she is especially interested in raising awareness of urgent human rights concerns surrounding the immigrant American experience and its interconnectedness to Central and Latin American politics and histories. Her dissertation, “Politics, Community and Pleasure: The Making of Mexican American Cold War Narratives in the Pages of La Opinion” adds a chapter to the cultural history of the post war period--one that has primarily focused on the experiences of Anglo Americans--by bringing to light how the Mexican American newspaper La Opinion interpreted and helped to shape the period. An analysis of La Opinion reveals a community’s preoccupation with identity politics, cultural pride and assimilative practices. The dissertation is organized around the discourse of the American dream; specifically, how the desire for consumption, liberal citizenship and labor in post World War II America produced specific accounts of migration in the pages of La Opinion. Through its publishers, editors and columnists La Opinion performed and celebrated political difference and civic duty to claim a stake in Americanism during the Cold War period.

2 thoughts on ““Yes to Scholars, No to Hitmen,”Andrés Manuel López Obrador Outlines Ambitious 6-Part Initiative focused on Mexican Youth Education & Work Life

    1. Thank you, John. I completely agree. Lopez Obrador is a very special leader, indeed. Mexico will accomplish great change under his leadership. He’s the real deal.

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