Acuerdo de Escazú Chile

Chile Debuts as a Member State at COP2 in Escazú

Chile Debuts as a Member State at COP2 in Escazú

Chile’s Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs, Gloria de la Fuente, and the Undersecretary for the Environment, Maximiliano Proaño, participated on April 20th in the opening of the second meeting of the Conferencia de las Partes del Acuerdo de Escazú, the first in which Chile attends as a full member.

The second Conference of the Parties to the Escazú Agreement (COP2 Escazú) launched in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Its main objective was the election of the seven representatives that will make up the Committee to Support the Application of Compliance with the Escazú Agreement, and to follow up on the other commitments acquired during the first COP, held in 2022, including the progress of the protocol for environmental defenders that was left in charge of Chile and Saint Kitts and Nevis, as reported by Ivannia Cordero for Codexverde.

Thus, the committee was made up of Guillermo Acuña (Chile), Mariana Blengio Valdés (Uruguay), Rita Leonette Joseph-Olivetti (Granada), Patricia Madrigal Cordero (Costa Rica), Andrés María Napoli (Argentina), Carole Denise Angela Stephens (Jamaica ), and Félix Wing Solís (Panama).

During the meeting, Chile presented its Roadmap for the implementation of the Escazú Agreement, whose main axis is the development of a Participatory Implementation Plan for Escazú (PIPE). This plan will evaluate, with the significant participation of the public, the gaps, opportunities and priority measures for the full and effective incorporation of the Escazú Agreement at the national level.

COP2 Escazú

At the beginning of COP2 Escazú, various civil society organizations, grouped in the Climate Action Network Latin America (CANLA) and the Escazú Now Regional Network, called on the states parties and the ECLAC Secretariat to promote the spirit of the treaty, promoting participation and transparency in decision-making, not only for effective implementation in each of the countries of the region, but also for the governance of the agreement itself.

 

Chile debuts as a State Party at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

This is the first time that Chile participates as a full member, after its accession in June 2022, for which government authorities expressed their commitment to the Conference.

 

“Regresamos. We are Back.” Chile debuts as a State Member at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

Chile co-chaired the working group on Defenders of Human Rights in environmental matters, which is one of the most distinctive elements of the Acuerdo.

The Undersecretary Gloria de la Fuente and the Undersecretary Maximiliano Proaño, participated in the inaugural ceremony of the COP2, held at the Centro Cultural Kirchner and which was headed by the President of Argentina, Alberto Fernández.

 

Chile debuts as a State Party at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

On the occasion, they received an acknowledgment of welcome to Chile for converting themselves into one of the new State Parties to the Agreement.

“We have received a recognition for our participation, which comes to reaffirm the commitment of the Government of Chile with multilateralism, with care for the environment and with the defense of human rights and democracy,” stated the Undersecretary of Foreign Affairs.

 

“Regresamos. We are Back.” Chile debuts as a State Member at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

For his part, the Undersecretary of the Environment said,

“Today we are a State Party, therefore, we have the great commitment and the challenge of being ambitious in terms of the implementation of the Escazú Agreement, of improving and raising the standards in terms of participation, information and environmental justice in our country.”

 

Chile debuts as a State Party at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

Escazú is the first treaty on environmental matters in the region and, the first in the world, which includes legally binding provisions on defenders of human rights in environmental matters.

 

Chile debuts as a State Member at the COP2 in Escazú. Image Credit: Ministeiro de Relaciones Exteriores, Chile.

 

The objective is to guarantee the full and effective implementation of the rights of access in environmental matters: the right to environmental information, public participation in environmental decision-making processes and access to justice in environmental matters, with the purpose to guarantee the human right to live in a healthy environment and the sustainable development of present and future generations.

 

Argentina inaugurates the second meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Escazú Agreement. Image Credit: Casa Rosada, Argentina.

 

Argentina’s President Alberto Fernandez

Argentina’s president inaugurated the second meeting of the Conference of the Parties of the Escazú Agreement

President Alberto Fernández along with the Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development, Juan Cabandié, launched the second meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Escazú Agreement, the first treaty on environmental rights for Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

Argentina inaugurates the second meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Escazú Agreement. Image Credit: Casa Rosada, Argentina.

 

“What summons us today is what the Escazú Agreement summoned us for: To involve civil society in a problem that the world is experiencing. A tremendous climate crisis,” said the president, also accompanied by the Secretary for Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Innovation, Cecilia Nicolini.

In the Argentina Hall of the Kirchner Cultural Center, the head of state assured that “the cause of the crisis is human greed, runaway financial capitalism that, in order to make money and deepen profits, does not measure the damage it is causing.”

“What we have is a profoundly unequal world, which now has the challenge of stopping hurting the planet, because it is our home,” he said, stating that “globalization is becoming an organization of regions.”

In this sense, he concluded that, within the framework of the climate crisis that the world is experiencing, Latin America and the Caribbean have to offer,

“Two things: something to demand, warnings that we are climate creditors and, secondly, promote understanding that we must work together.” 

The Escazú Agreement is the first of its kind in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the only one in the world that incorporates specific provisions on human rights defenders in environmental matters. Its pillars are access to information, participation and environmental justice; and the training of authorities, citizen awareness and cooperation between States.

It was signed by 15 countries in the region: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Grenada, Guyana, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and Uruguay.

 

 

“In addition to the demands that we establish and that the member countries affirm, we have to be demanding outside. Because the largest amount of emissions on the planet are produced in the northern hemisphere,” warned Cabandié, and reflected: “We have to solve two problems, the inequalities of the 20th century and the environmental challenges of the 21st century.”

Nicolini pointed out that “placing the environmental agenda at the center of debates in the region is urgent” and in that sense, “The pillars of Escazú are the foundations for building a true environmental democracy and a commitment to our histories of struggle, our present and future generations.”

A Call to Include Civil Society

“The effective implementation of this agreement implies not only that each country advance in the implementation of the principles of Access to Information, Participation and Justice in environmental matters, but also to place special emphasis on providing a safe environment for environmental defenders, constituting a solid governance that ensures maintaining and raising the standards of public participation in instances like these. We call on the secretariat and the States parties, that both the next COP and the forum of Environmental Defenders be organized in good time to allow citizens to organize their participation and for the hosts to ensure spaces with adequate capacity,” said Vanessa Torres from the Regional Network for the Escazú Agreement (EscazúAhora).

To learn more, visit Escazu Ahora, Chile.

Read President Alberto Fernandez’ Speech

 


Dr. Soledad Quartucci | Founder

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