El Salvador Museo MARTE Trópico Telúrico

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art

“Our new semi-permanent exhibition begins, through a series of maps and documents, with a reflection on the construction of the Salvadoran territory and the first images that represented it. In them we see volcanoes as distinctive symbols of our territory,” Museo MARTE.

“Telluric Tropic,” curated by Jaime Izaguirre is on display from May 23, 2023 to December 2026.

The Museum of Art of El Salvador (MARS) is currently hosting an exhibition called “Trópico Telúrico,” which explores the history of El Salvador through art. The exhibition aims to visually demonstrate how artworks evolve over time in response to social, political, and economic circumstances.

Through each artwork on display, visitors are encouraged to recognize the pivotal moments that have shaped history and how they have influenced artistic expression. The exhibition is divided into ten distinct sections, describes Marbely Merino for Diario El Salvador.

 

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art
Museo Marte’s Exhibition, Tropico Teleurico, tells the Story of El Salvador. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

“The use of ‘tropics’ and ‘tellurics’ not only refers to our seismic territory but also symbolizes the diverse political, social, and economic situations that have impacted Salvadoran society in various ways. The artworks range from the 1800s to the present day, encompassing paintings, sculptures, maps, engravings dating back to the 1700s, video games, and graffiti,” explained Jaime Izaguirre, the exhibition’s curator.

 

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art
Museo Marte’s Exhibition, Tropico Teleurico, tells the Story of El Salvador. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

The exhibition brings together over 80 works created by 70 national artists. Izaguirre mentioned that a year-long investigation was conducted, reviewing more than 500 proposals, in order to select the artworks.

The initial three sections focus on the early 19th century, starting from around 1800. The first section, titled “An Exotic Territory,” displays maps, stamps, and documents that aim to illustrate the consolidation of the country, both as a physical territory and as a cultural landscape.

 

Museo Marte’s Exhibition, Tropico Teleurico, tells the Story of El Salvador. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

“It’s an intriguing introduction because even though they are maps, stamps, and documents, they are engravings, which is an artistic technique,” explained the curator.

The second section, named “A Symbolic Territory,” exhibits stamps, postcards, and legal documents. Here, landscapes start to be symbolically employed, such as the inclusion of the Izalco volcano in the country’s first coat of arms. The section also presents documents featuring prominent women of that era and other distinctive elements.

 

Museo Marte’s Exhibition, Tropico Teleurico, tells the Story of El Salvador. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

In the third part, titled “An Exotic Gaze,” surreal paintings depicting agricultural work are displayed. Izaguirre clarified, “During this period, the artistic references and validation are defined by foreigners and are even promoted.”

The fourth section of the exhibition, called “From Reality to Denunciation,” explores the 1950s, a time of governmental and constitutional changes. The artworks become more abstract, reflecting the political and economic situations of the era.

“In this part, we can observe the introduction of abstraction and how artists begin to work with different materials. Additionally, the 1950s witnessed a cultural, economic, and socio-political surge,” emphasized Izaguirre.

 

Museo Marte’s Exhibition, Tropico Teleurico, tells the Story of El Salvador. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

Telluric Tropic, Curated by Jaime Izaguirre is on display from May 23, 2023 to December 2026.

“Teluric Tropic” serves as a powerful metaphor, describes the Museo MARTE. By utilizing captivating imagery and captivating works of art, this exhibition invites its visitors to delve into the vibrant history and diverse cultural influences that have molded the identity of El Salvador.

 

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art
Telluric Tropic, Curated by Jaime Izaguirre, Visit the Exhibition, From May 23, 2023 to December 2026, Image Credit: Museo Marte, El Salvador.

 

The exhibition commences with an exploration of Theodorus de Bry’s gaze, captured in an engraving found in the book “Voyage to the West Indies.” De Bry’s portrayal depicts El Salvador as a wild and exotic territory, adorned with erupting volcanoes and figures in their natural state. This artwork acts as a launching point for an in-depth examination of the evolving visual representation of El Salvador throughout history.

 

The Museum of Art of El Salvador, Explores National History through Art
Telluric Tropic, Curated by Jaime Izaguirre, Visit the Exhibition, From May 23, 2023 to December 2026, Image Credit: Museo Marte, El Salvador.

 

From the earliest maps showcasing the shifting borders of New Spain to the inaugural official map of El Salvador, the exhibition delves into the role of landscapes and symbols in shaping the country’s collective identity. It investigates how these elements have played a pivotal role in defining El Salvador’s national heritage.

Moreover, the exhibition highlights the era of modernization that swept through El Salvador from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. This period was marked by the coffee boom, market diversification, and Central American integration, which facilitated the construction of monuments, buildings, and the emergence of artistic movements that sought to reflect Salvadoran identity, history, and culture.

 

Telluric Tropic, Curated by Jaime Izaguirre, Visit the Exhibition, From May 23, 2023 to December 2026, Image Credit: Museo Marte, El Salvador.

 

Additionally, the exhibition delves into the backdrop of the civil war that ravaged El Salvador from 1980 to 1992. Examining the conflict that stemmed from political and economic disparities, the exhibition sheds light on its profound impact on Salvadoran society, exacerbating pre-existing divisions. It showcases how art became a potent means of expression and denunciation during this tumultuous period.

 

Inauguration of Tropico Teleurico. Image credit: Museo Marte, El Salvador.

 

“Trópico Telúrico” serves as a catalyst for visitors to contemplate Salvadoran history and explore the intricate connections between historical events, artistic production, and identity. Through an array of art forms, ranging from paintings and prints to sculptures, the exhibition aims to foster dialogue and deepen understanding of El Salvador’s multifaceted and intricate culture.

 

Tropico Teleurico. Image Credit: Museo Marte, El Salvador.

 

The Museum Marte invites everyone to stop by on the weekends, where the public can enjoy exhibits and educational activities for the family.

 

Museo Marte showcases distinguished exhibitions and artistic activities on the weekends for the whole family. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

 

Museo Marte showcases distinguished exhibitions and artistic activities on the weekends for the whole family. Image Credit- Museo Marte.

 

“This is how we live the activities of #MARTEenFamilia. Every weekend discover the museum and all the works that we have on display through different activities organized by our educational team,” Museo Marte.

To learn more, visit: Museo MARTE.

 


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